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When To Contact A Low Vision Doctor: When You Can’t See To Do What You Want To Do

Question mark on blackboardWhen you break your leg, you feel the pain of the fracture and visit a doctor to repair the broken limb. When you hurt your back, you go to a chiropractor to relieve the intense pain. But what happens when you experience vision loss without even noticing it? How do you know when to visit a low vision doctor if you don’t feel any pain?

What Are the Common Symptoms of Vision Loss?

Some signs of vision loss often go unnoticed until the symptoms are far along. Signs of vision loss typically include the following:

  • Blurry vision
  • Cloudy vision
  • Decreased peripheral (side) vision
  • Difficulty seeing clearly at night
  • Frequent headaches
  • Reduced central vision (what you see straight ahead)
  • Seeing halos around lights
  • Sensitivity to light

Especially in its earlier stages, certain signs of low vision can easily be attributed to other things. Frequent headaches can be triggered by stress or excessive computer use, light sensitivity can develop from migraines, anxiety, or certain medications, and even blurry vision may be the result of an eye infection, exhaustion, or dehydration.

When Low Vision Becomes Serious

Blonde Woman, sad about low vision diagnosisSo how can you know when your symptoms are serious? One way to know is by paying attention to how changes in vision affect your daily life. If driving at night becomes increasingly difficult, if you notice that headaches are becoming persistent, or if reading or watching TV isn’t enjoyable because the images are unclear, it may be more than just a temporary symptom.

Low vision is a significant visual impairment, which isn’t corrected by simply wearing glasses or contact lenses. It not only impacts your everyday activities, but can cause long-term vision loss – even blindness, if left untreated – so if doing what you love is becoming hard because of poor vision, it’s time to visit a low vision doctor.

How Does A Low Vision Doctor Help?

A low vision doctor focuses on maximizing your remaining vision to help you continue doing what you enjoy. Dr. Shaun Golemba does this with the help of low vision glasses and devices. These tools magnify images, allowing you to see details for sharp, clear vision.

If vision loss makes it hard for you to read your favorite book or a restaurant menu, microscope glasses can help. They enlarge the text so you can enjoy reading once again. Have fun dining out with friends without asking for help reading the menu. It’s all about living an independent life in the best way possible!

Elderly asian man, dark eye-colorWhen it comes to the people closest to you, there’s nothing more painful than being unable to recognize them. Low vision can make it hard to recognize faces, so when your grandchildren come to visit, of course, you want to see their smiling faces in detail. Low Vision Center At Valley Vision Optometry can help you with that by providing you with the right low vision devices.

If you love the freedom and independence that driving offers, vision loss can make that difficult. Your low vision optometrist can fit you for bioptic telescope glasses. These devices magnify objects like street signs and traffic lights. These elements of your environment appear sharper, so you can see them clearly and can continue driving safely, even while driving at night.

If you or a loved one is experiencing any symptoms of vision loss, schedule a visit with Low Vision Center At Valley Vision Optometry. Dr. Shaun Golemba will perform a thorough eye exam and talk to you about how to maximize your remaining vision to help you continue doing the things you want to do, for the best quality of life.

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We are currently offering in-office care by appointment only.

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COVID-19 UPDATE

The following is a summary of the steps we have taken to protect your safety.

Physical Distancing Measures:

o Reducing density of people: We have adopted a schedule which will reduce the amount of patients in our facility at one time.

o We will have some of our team working from home operating a call centre and tele-medicine pre-screening.

o Spacing stickers have been placed on our floor.

Engineering controls:

o Forms have been digitized and will be emailed to patients in advance of the appointment to minimize contact.

o A “For Payment" button has been installed on our website, valleyvisionoptometry.ca for patients to be able to pay from home to minimize contact.

o Plexiglass barriers have been installed at all 3 Front Desk stations

o Our doors will remain locked during Phase 2, opening the door to let in scheduled patients only.

o A dropbox has been installed for patients to drop off glasses in need of repair.

o Contact lens sales are administered through our webstore.

Administrative controls:

o Cleaning protocols have been written. Staff training on these protocols has been scheduled.

o Clear rules are posted on our front door and throughout all of the stations in our office.

Personal protective equipment:

o Patients will be required to wear a mask upon entry to the office and throughout their time with us. Those who do not have a mask will be supplied a surgical mask upon entry.

Policies around sickness:

o Employees and patients with cold or flu symptoms will be required to stay home.

Frequent hand washing:

o Patients, Doctors, and our Team will be required to wash hands upon entry and exit in to the exam rooms.

o Eyewear Consultants will wear gloves when handling eyewear and performing adjustments.

We currently are operating a reduced schedule, so are triaging patients to ensure those with the highest needs are prioritized.

Sincerely,

Dr. Shaun Golemba

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We are open by appointment only. Our current hours are Monday to Friday, 8am – 4pm. Please call our office to schedule an appointment. Read about our safety protocols here.